NEWSNEWSNEWS

SLIM BY A GYM

A new study published in the Lancet Public
Health Journal claims that people who live
within half a mile of a gym, swimming pool or
playing field are less likely to be fat. The study of
over 400,000 people aged between 40-70, also
showed living away from fast food outlets was
linked to smaller waists and lower BMIs.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

According to new research from Binghamton
University, New York, youngsters should eat
meat more than three times a week to boost
their mental health, while older people should
avoid white carbs. Meat boosts feel-good
brain chemicals in the under-30s, but coffee,
cakes and white bread raise blood glucose
which increases stress in the over-30s.

YOGA EFFECTIVE FOR BACK PAIN

A new study involving 150 NHS employees has found that yoga is highly elective in reducing back pain. The yoga practising group received a total of eight 60-minute yoga sessions, once a week for eight weeks, and were encouraged to practise for 10 minutes a day at home for six months, while the education only group received two instructional
booklets for how to manage back pain and reduce stress at work. The yoga programme was based on Dru Yoga and included gentle warm-up movements; stretching, relaxation
techniques and back care postures. After eight weeks, results showed that most yoga participants had larger reductions in back pain compared to the education group, and after six months, the yoga participants had 20 times less sick leave due to musculoskeletal conditions and visited health professionals for back pain only half as often during the six month study. Those who practised yoga at home for 60 minutes or more improved the most, while ten minutes of practice a day doubled the reduction in back pain.

BALDNESS LINK TO BAD HEART 

Men who go bald or grey young are five times more likely to develop heart disease before the age of 40 an Indian study has found. Researchers found baldness and premature greying are associated with a five-fold risk of heart disease, where obesity was linked to a four-fold risk. Scientists from the UN Mehta Institute in Ahmedabad said men with the conditions should receive extra monitoring.

BACK PAIN HOPE

A groundbreaking and minimally invasive treatment can give long-term relief from crippling back pain according to a new study. In a trial, 81 per cent of patients with
lower back pain and sciatica were pain-free for a year after 10 minutes of image-guided pulsed radiofrequency therapy. A major cause of chronic lower back pain is compressed and herniated discs, where the cushion between vertebrae impinges on and irritates nearby nerves. This new technique, involved a needle guided to a bulging disc using CT imaging, and a probe is inserted through the tip, delivering pulsed energy to the affected area for 10 minutes. From the study, 90 per cent of patients were able to avoid surgical treatment and none of the patients experienced any side effects.

MINDFULNESS-BASED YOGA CAN HELP YOUNGSTERS DEAL WITH STRESSFUL SITUATIONS

Researchers from the University of Cincinnati looked at the link between stressful life events and an increase in substance abuse, risky sexual behaviours and delinquency in a diverse population of 18-to-24 year old youths. In the 10 year study, they found that practising mindfulness-based yoga can help young people, who are dealing with stressful situations like exposure to violence and family disruption, avoid turning to negative, risky behaviours.

BREAKFAST IS GOOD FOR THE HEART

Eating breakfast everyday may reduce the risk of heart disease according to new research from Bath University. Their study suggests that the meal affects our body fat cells by decreasing the activity of genes involved in fat metabolism and increasing how much sugar they take up. 

MEDITATION WITH
WALKING REDUCES ANXIETY

A new study published in the American Journal of
Health Promotion claims that adding 10 minutes of
meditation before or after a brief walk significantly
reduces anxiety in university students. The study
which involved 110 students in their early 20s, also
showed that a 10-minute walk by itself did not result in significant changes in their anxiety, which
suggests that meditation before of after aerobic exercise can help reduce anxiety levels more than just
physical exercise alone.

MINDFULNESS
MEDITATION CAN OFFSET
THE WORRY OF WAITING

In the journal Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, a new study claims that mindfulness is an antidote to the curse of ‘waiting’. The study was performed using 150 California law students who had taken the bar exam and had to wait four months for their results. During this period the students participated in a 15-minute audio-guided meditation session at least once a week and completed a series of questionnaires. Researchers found that mindfulness meditation served to postpone the phenomenon of ‘bracing’ – essentially preparing for the worst – which can be an effective technique for managing expectations, but its benefits erode when it occurs too early in the waiting process.

‘MAN FLU’ IS REAL

A new study published in the British Medical Journal found that adult males are often laid low by coughs and sneezes that women can shrug o!, due to the male metabolism having a weaker resistance to a host of deadly bugs and viruses. Dr. Kyle Sue of the Newfoundland Memorial University in Canada suggests that men’s bodies may have evolved to invest their energies in reproduction rather than in fighting off  flu.

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